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Special Orders

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john hunt morgan
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Brigadier-General
Confederate States Army
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Background Music:
"the girl i left behind me"
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PAGE BOOKMARKS

S.O. No 1.
conduct & behavior
S.O. No 2.
authenticity standards
S.O. No 3.
quartermaster dept.
S.O. No 4.
military promotions
S.O. No 5.
camp charity
S.O. No 6.
weapons safety
S.O. No 7.
schedule of finances
S.O. No 8.
non-commissioned officers

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SPECIAL ORDER
No 1.

CONDUCT & BEHAVIOR

Members of this organization have a duty to project the best image of the Southern Confederacy through courteous and respectful demeanor at all times.  To this end, the display of character that may discredit and/or impugn the good name and reputation of the Lexington Rifles is prohibited.  Conduct that can be considered unbecoming for a member of polite society in antebellum Kentucky is subject to disciplinary action by the Company.  In addition, criminal behavior is subject to prosecution in accordance with the statutes of state and local jurisdictions.

Children must be properly attired in period clothing.  Parents or guardians are responsible for the behavior and actions of their children.

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SPECIAL ORDER
No
2.

AUTHENTICITY STANDARDS

The material and the construction for garments and equipment must conform to those which were commonly employed in the Western Theater of War during the period 1861-1865.  Items and styles not reflective of that period are considered unacceptable anachronisms. 

The acquisition and use of items which have historical provenance is preferred and encouraged.  Members are also encouraged to use language and behavior modifications to more accurately represent an authentic historical portrayal.  

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SPECIAL ORDER
No
3.

quartermaster dept.

The Chief of Staff may appoint members to serve at his pleasure in unofficial positions of responsibility to provide various logistical services for the Company.  Collectively, these unofficial positions function as a Quartermaster Department

I.  Logistical Duties
Herein are the recognized positions of responsibility for various services.

A.  Ordnance Clerk
The Ordnance Clerk procures and maintains the inventory of black powder and percussion caps that is owned by the Company, and is responsible for their sale.

B.  Hospital Steward
The Hospital Steward collects and maintains a confidential list of members’ medical histories and health information to be used in case of emergency, and is responsible for a first-aid kit.

C.  Chaplain
The Chaplain attends to the spiritual needs and religious traditions of the Company. 

D.  Commissary Steward
The Commissary Steward procures and prepares subsistence for the Company mess.

E.  Supply Clerk
The Supply Clerk maintains the inventory of donated clothing, arms, and equipment for temporary use in cases of need.  

F.  Webmaster
The Webmaster maintains and oversees internet portals for the Company.  

 

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SPECIAL ORDER
No
4.
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MILITARY PROMOTIONS

In order to reflect a proper ratio of rank and file, the Company shall elect two military commanders - one of senior rank and one of junior rank -  who may adjust their rank portrayals to that which are appropriate for the number of men present.  Squad leaders will act as Corporals, and section leaders will act as Sergeants; both ranks being under the supervision of the First Sergeant.  Platoon commanders will act as Lieutenants, and the Company commander will act as Captain.  

The display of rank insignia that is appropriate for a particular portrayal shall be discretionary unless upon order of the Company commander.  In any case, the non-display of rank insignia shall not affect the authority of the rank portrayed.    

Article of War No. 61 of the “Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States” allows for brevet promotions.  Such appointments to rank may be made by the senior ranking commander, but are valid only for the specific circumstance for which they occur.

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SPECIAL ORDER
No 5.

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CAMP CHARITY

The campsite of the Lexington Rifles will be referred to as "Camp Charity" in honor of the camp that was established from Sept. 22-25, 1861 at a farm west of Bloomfield, along the Middle Branch of Simpson’s Creek, in Nelson County, Kentucky.  Here, the Lexington Rifles encamped with the Nelson Greys, a State Guard militia company from Bardstown, whose commander, Capt. John C. Wickliffe, chose the site because the landowner was a Confederate sympathizer.  Due to the charitable donations of food and equipment from the generous and patriotic townspeople of Bloomfield, Morgan’s grateful men dubbed their camp as "Camp Charity".   

In order for Camp Charity to remain orderly, each person has the responsibility to maintain sanitary conditions through the policing and proper disposal of all refuse.  Tent fronts should be aligned to create a street that is kept clear of fire pits, shelters, and unattended equipment.  Whenever possible, the camp should be situated near other cavalry camps, but horses are prohibited from the street.

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SPECIAL ORDER
No
SPECIAL ORDER
No
6.
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WEAPONS SAFETY

The senior military commander shall verify compliance with all requirements of this order.  Any weapon or ammunition that does not comply with this order shall not be used. 

I.  Firearms
All firearms must be percussion-fired, of pre-1865 design.  Each firearm shall be inspected prior to its use to ensure that it is operational and in safe firing condition.  Gun barrels shall be free of obstructions, and hammers shall have functional half-cock and full-cock settings. 

A.  Shoulder Arms
No more than one shoulder arm may be carried.  Only safety officers may draw a ramrod on the field to clear a malfunctioning weapon.

B.  Side Arms
No more than two pistols may be carried, worn at the hip in period holsters.

II.  Munitions
Arms projectiles are prohibited on site.  Only black powder will be used as a propellant and shall not be carried in bulk.  Cartridges and percussion caps shall be carried in period leather pouches designed for that purpose.  Pistol chambers shall be packed using only wheat farina-type cereal.

III. Edged Weapons
Edged weapons will only be carried in appropriate sheaths or scabbards.

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SPECIAL ORDER
No
7.

SCHEDULE OF FINANCES

In managing the finances of the Company Treasury, the Paymaster is charged with the collection of revenue and the disbursement of funds in accordance with the approved operating budget and this Special Order.  The deadline for payment of any debt that is owed to the Company will be the last scheduled event of each year.    

I.  Revenue
The following are recognized sources of income and their rates of exchange.

A.  Authenticity Fine
To enforce regulations pertaining to standards of authenticity and behavior, the authority to assess a fine for minor infractions of these Special Orders is granted to any member who identifies an offense, and who then shall immediately bring it to the attention of the violator for correction.  Levy of this fine is meant solely to encourage compliance with these regulations and is not meant to be punitive.  Therefore, the violator should freely admit culpability for the infraction before voluntary payment, based upon gentlemanly good will and honor, is rendered.  Non-payment of the fine due to disagreement of culpability shall not affect membership status in any way, nor harm the member’s reputation.

To enforce regulations pertaining to standards of authenticity and behavior, the authority to assess a fine for minor infractions of these Special Orders is granted to any member who identifies an offense, and who then shall immediately bring it to the attention of the violator for correction.  Levy of this fine is meant solely to encourage compliance with these regulations and is not meant to be punitive.  Therefore, the violator should freely admit culpability for the infraction before voluntary payment, based upon gentlemanly good will and honor, is rendered.  Non-payment of the fine due to disagreement of culpability shall not affect membership status in any way, nor harm the member’s reputation.
To enforce regulations pertaining to standards of authenticity and behavior, the authority to assess a fine for minor infractions of these Special Orders is granted to any member who identifies an offense, and who then shall immediately bring it to the attention of the violator for correction.  Levy of this fine is meant solely to encourage compliance with these regulations and is not meant to be punitive.  Therefore, the violator should freely admit culpability for the infraction before voluntary payment, based upon gentlemanly good will and honor, is rendered.  Non-payment of the fine due to disagreement of culpability shall not affect membership status in any way, nor harm the member’s reputation.

1.)  The amount of the fine will be 25 cents, which was the amount assessed in 1857 by John Hunt Morgan for infractions of Company regulations by both himself and other members of the Lexington Rifles. 

 

SPECIAL ORDER
No SPECIAL ORDER
No

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WEAPONS SAFETY

The ranking military person is responsible to ensure compliance with this order.  Any weapon or ammunition which does not meet the requirements of this order shall not be used.  

I.  Firearms
All firearms must be percussion-fired, of pre-1865 design.  Each firearm shall be inspected prior to its use to ensure that it is in operationally safe firing condition.  Gun barrels shall be free of obstructions, and hammers shall have functional half-cock and full-cock settings. 

A.  Shoulder Arms
No more than one shoulder arm may be carried.  Only safety officers may draw a ramrod on the field to clear a malfunctioning weapon.

B.  Side Arms
No more than two pistols may be carried, worn at the hip in period holsters.

II.  Munitions
Arms projectiles are prohibited on site.  Only black powder will be used as a propellant and shall not be carried in bulk.  Cartridges and percussion caps shall be carried in period leather pouches designed for that purpose.  Pistol chambers shall be packed using only wheat farina-type cereal.

III. Edged Weapons
Edged weapons will only be carried in appropriate sheaths or scabbards.

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SPECIAL ORDER
No
7.

SCHEDULE OF FINANCES

In managing the finances of the treasury, the Paymaster is charged with the collection of revenue and the disbursement of funds in accordance with the approved operating budget and this special order.  Monies collected are to be deposited into the treasury.  The deadline for payment of any debt that is owed to the Company will be the last scheduled event of each year.  The maximum amount of credit that is to be extended to each debtor is set at fifty dollars United States currency.    

I.  Revenue
The following are recognized sources of income.

A.  Authenticity Fine
In order to enforce regulations pertaining to standards of authenticity and behavior, the authority to assess a fine for minor infractions of these special orders is granted to any member who identifies an infraction, which shall be brought immediately to the attention of the violator for correction.

1.) Levy of this fine is meant solely to encourage compliance with these regulations and is not meant to be punitive.  Therefore, culpability for the infraction is to be         freely admitted before voluntary payment, based upon good will and honor, is rendered.

2.)  Non-payment of the fine due to disagreement of culpability shall not affect membership status in any way, nor harm the member’s reputation.

3.) The amount of the fine is permanently set at twenty-five cents, which was the amount assessed by Captain Morgan in 1857 for infractions of Company regulations by both himself and other members of the Lexington Rifles. 

B.  Bounties and Honoraria
Monetary bounties and honoraria that are received by individuals for acting in service of the Company are considered property of the individual, but those received by the Company become property of the Company.  The use and rate of exchange for any item of value may be determined by the Company.  

C.  Ordnance Sales
The rate of sale for Company-owned munitions to members and recruits will be set at a not-for-profit cost amount.  A surcharge will be imposed for sales to non-members.

D.  Commutation Fees
During the war, propertied men could legally procure their exemption from conscripted military service by paying a commutation fee to the government.  In keeping with this practice, and to equalize individual contributions to the Treasury through honoraria earned from fund raising activities, a commutation fee in an amount set by the Company may be levied upon military members in lieu of their participation in such efforts.                      

E.  Imposts
Imposts may be levied to pay for special needs
which are not listed in the annual budget.  These may be time and/or need specific and include, but not be limited to, the purchase of ammunition, equipment, and provisions.

F.  Membership Dues
A monetary charge, which shall be used to fund the operating budget and activities of the Company,  may be imposed annually on each military member of the Company.  The
dues are payable by the date of the annual convention, but shall be prorated for newly activated members.  Honorary members, females, and recruits are exempt from payment of dues

II Disbursements
The following are recognized legitimate expenditures.

A Reimbursements
The Company may authorize the reimbursement of persons for expenses incurred in the interest of the Company, including, but not being limited to, subsistence, office supplies, and approved purchases. 

BProvisions
The Company may procure and store equipment and supplies in the form of victuals, clothing, shelter, and war materiel as needed for the defense against tyranny. 

C.  Internet
The Company may contract for an internet website

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SPECIAL ORDER
No 8.

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NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS

These guidelines are based on The Non-Commissioned Officers Guide for Civil War Re-enactors, by M. Craig Hadley, Professional Historian; and on “Customs of Service for Non-Commissioned Officers and Soldiers” (1864) by Brig.-Gen. August V. Kautz, United States Volunteers, who as Colonel of the Second Ohio Cavalry opposed Brig.-Gen. John Hunt Morgan’s raid into Indiana and Ohio.  The information herein has been edited to suit the specific needs of the Lexington Rifles.    

I.  Description
Non-commissioned officers are enlisted men who hold positions of authority and responsibility.  Often called NCOs, they play a crucial role in daily military operations, serving as liaison between regular enlisted men and commissioned officers, and often assisting officers with a variety of administrative tasks.  The successful operation of the Company and the well-being of its personnel are the responsibilities of the NCO.

In his opus, “Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States”, (1794), commonly referred to as the "Blue Book", America's first inspector-general, the Baron Friedrich Von Steuben, noted the following:  

"The choice of non-commissioned officers is an object of the greatest importance: The order and discipline of a regiment depend so much on their behavior that too much care cannot be taken in preferring none to that trust but those who by their merit and good conduct are entitled to it.  Honesty, sobriety, and a remarkable attention to every point of duty, with neatness in their dress, are indispensable requisites…" 

IIRank
The following specifications are copied and edited from “Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States Article XLVII, Uniform and Dress of the Army”.  Any variation or omission from these regulations must first be approved by the Authenticity Committee.

A.  Trousers
Para. 1489.  For all sergeants, a stripe of cotton webbing or braid on the outer seam, one and a quarter inch in width; color according to arm of service.. 

B.  Sash
Para. 1510.  For sergeants, of worsted with worsted bullion fringe ends; yellow for Cavalry, to go twice around the waist and to tie above the left hip; pendent part not to extend more than eighteen inches below the tie.

C.  Chevrons
Para. 1529.  The rank of non-commissioned officers will be marked by chevrons upon both sleeves of the uniform coat and the overcoat, above the elbow, of silk or worsted binding one-half inch wide; color the same as the edging of the coat; points down as follows: 
Para. 15
33 For a First Sergeant – three bars and a lozenge in worsted. 
Para. 15
34 For a Sergeant – three bars in worsted.
Para. 15
35 For a Corporal – two bars in worsted.

III.  General Duties
Many of the duties and responsibilities of NCOs are shared across all levels and grades of non-commissioned rank.  Among those are the following: 

ATroop Welfare
The first duty and responsibility of all NCOs is the welfare of the men.  NCOs should regularly check the health of the men, and medical issues of any kind (high blood pressure, diabetes, etc.) should be recorded in a notebook.  This information is vital and
it should be available to medical personnel in case of emergency.  NCOs should exclude anyone from activity if dangerous condition exists.

Regardless of temperature, NCOs will ensure that each man remains hydrated and has a full canteen of water (not whiskey!) at formation.  They should also make sure the men are given regular and periodic rest breaks.

NCOs should ensure that the men have protection from the elements, keeping them out of direct sunlight and rain whenever possible.  This also may include assigning men to keep the fires burning all night.

NCOs should assign a “buddy system” prior to battle to mutually check on each other’s true physical condition if someone should fall on the field.  They should also clearly identify a post-battle rendezvous point and rest area for all participants

B.  Leadership
NCOs should lead by example and be role models for the men in their appearance and attendance.  The neatness and cleanliness of their clothing, arms, and accoutrements should be examples for others to follow.  They should be the first into formation at roll calls and should have their quarters always in order.  Dependable event attendance by non-commissioned officers not only can be inspirational to others, but it also shows that the honor of being chosen as NCO is taken seriously. 

C.  Communication
NCOs should keep the men in their charge informed as to occurrences and plans.  An explanation should be furnished to them concerning any delays or changes, the goal being for the NCO to be the point-of-contact for their knowledge.

D.  Note Book
NCOs should have a period pencil and notebook to record names of personnel, their personal contact information, medical condition, guard details, and fatigue assignments, as well as schedules and orders for the day.  This also helps to ensure that details are assigned fairly and proportionally

E.  Passes
It is important to know where the men are at all times to ensure adherence to timetables, completion of their duty assignments, and in cases of emergency or need.  To accomplish this, the men should request permission to leave camp.  NCOs must insist that their men tell them where they are going and approximately when they will return.

F.  Drill
NCOs must understand cavalry skirmish tactics and should be able to teach the School of the Trooper.  They should also be able to take over as First Sergeant in case of his absence or incapacity.

G.  Parroting Commands
NCOs should not parrot a command in formation unless it cannot be heard.  Many drill manuals do allow for NCOs to parrot commands, but this is only for purposes of training on the drill field.

IVCorporal
The appointment to Corporal is the first step of promotion, and is usually selected from those who are noted for their military appearance and attention to duty.  As the Corporal is the closest NCO to Privates in the ranks, he is the first point-of-contact with whom a Private consults for questions, concerns, or immediate help with problems.  The duties of a Corporal are simple but important, and his successful performance depends mainly upon his ability to direct troopers in the performance of their duties.

A.  Troop Conduct
For the sake of maintaining the company’s good reputation, the Corporal is charged with correcting misbehavior by his men.  Whether it is being loud after taps; the use of profane language around women and children; or the abuse of others (aside from the good-natured kind) in word or deed, it must be stopped.  This can be a difficult duty to perform, but it is essential for good order and discipline in the organization.

B.  Obedience to Orders
If a trooper neglects his duty, the Corporal should report the fact to the First Sergeant, whose duty it is to decide in the matter, or to report it to his superior.  Since non-commissioned officers may, at times, unwittingly favor certain troopers in the assignment of disagreeable details, they should strive to treat the men fairly by keeping track of their assignments.

C.  Weapons Maintenance
The Corporal should ensure that the men in his squad properly care for their weapons in the field, and are knowledgeable concerning their basic operation and safe handling.

D.  Troop Morale
The Corporal should strive to build a bond with his men by ensuring they are in good health and spirits, and by encouraging and assisting them with the smallest details.  This can make a real difference in building the morale of the troops.  In turn, the Corporal has the responsibility to relay any problems he experiences to his Sergeant. 

VSergeant
The duties of a Sergeant are similar to those of a Corporal, with the exception of the number of men under their respective charges.  Sergeants are usually entrusted with responsibility for the general supervision of the men and the mentoring of Corporals, while corporals are responsible for details.  The Sergeant coordinates and superintends the work which the First Sergeant has directed to be executed. 

VIFirst Sergeant
The First Sergeant is in operational charge of the Company.  As “Top Soldier”, his first duty is to the welfare of the entire company, so it is therefore the most important NCO position.  The First Sergeant receives his orders from the officer commanding the company and sees that they are performed.  He also commands the company in the absence of an officer.

A.  Administration
The First Sergeant is responsible for completing company paperwork, of which he should keep a supply with his kit.  He maintains rosters and makes all details and morning reports before submitting them to the commanding officer for his signature.

In addition to keeping a Company Manual with his kit, the First Sergeant should also maintain a notebook containing emergency information, a breakdown of the company by platoons, sections and squads; a list of fatigue details; a list of the men who are absent on passes and when they are due to return; and all orders given to the company.   

BNCO Meetings
The First Sergeant should have a close working relationship with the other NCOs and should hold a meeting with them as a group each morning and evening to ensure good communication.  The meeting in the morning should follow the event’s NCO call.  Any information can then be conveyed to create duty rosters, fatigue details and drill schedules

1.)  The morning meeting should follow the event’s NCO call.  Any information can then be conveyed to create duty rosters, fatigue details and drill schedules.

2.)  The evening meeting should review the day’s events, fatigue details for the evening, and plans for the next day.  In turn, the other NCOs should use the evening meeting to offer feedback from the men.  

C.  Roll Calls
The First Sergeant conducts roll call each morning whereby the company is formed without arms and he faces it, taking his place eight paces in front of its center.  Absentees are reported by name to the officer in command.  If none are absent, he reports "All present and accounted for".  The First Sergeant then takes his post on the right and acts as right guide.

DWork Details
The First Sergeant should remind all NCOs of their daily duties -- pickets, water, firewood, fire pit, guard post, cooking, dishwashing, etc, which should be decided at the morning and evening meetings.  A notebook becomes important in distributing this work fairly.  The NCOs are then responsible for their completion.  This lends a more military air and helps the men to feel they are performing an important job rather than just a chore.

E.  Drill Instruction
The First Sergeant is in charge of training and drilling the company, while it is the company commander who oversees the drill sessions.  As drill instructor, the First Sergeant ensures that the NCOs perform properly and, in consultation with the company commander, he schedules what aspects the company needs to practice.

FFile Closer
Posted in the rear of the company when paraded, the First Sergeant preserves order in the ranks by ensuring that the men march properly, keep closed, and not fall out on any pretext.  During battle, he prevents misbehavior in front of the Enemy, by being required to shoot men down if they should attempt to flee.  

1.)  As file closer, the First Sergeant is also a safety officer.  He may take charge of a fouled weapon and exchange it for one that is functioning.  He also ensures that ramrods are not drawn on the field.  Only file-closers are allowed to draw a ramrod on the field to clear a fouled piece.

GDiscipline
The First Sergeant is the disciplinarian for the Company.  He ensures that the other NCOs perform their duties and he holds them responsible for the condition of their respective charges.  If a trooper neglects his duty or breaks the rules, it is the responsibility of the First Sergeant to decide in the matter or to report it to his superior.

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